North Merrick Public Library

North Merrick Logo - Celebrating 50 yearsThe North Merrick Public Library Board was given an “Outstanding Trustees Award”  by the Library Trustees Association of New York. The award was given at the Trustee Institute on Long Island sponsored by LTA in April.

The library offers these exciting opportunities:

Engage

In addition to providing you with reading and viewing resources, the library provides vehicles by which you may engage with others.


Display Your Artwork

A wall in the Reference Room has been designated as a space where artwork can be hung for display. Artists are encouraged to display their work and to provide a brief statement about the work being displayed and/or a biographical statement.

Contact our Public Relations Librarian for further information.


(Left to right: Tim Gavin, LTA Executive Director, Library Board President, Bill Pezzulo, Board VP, Marion Schurade, Library Director, Tom Witt, incoming Library Trustee, Kristin Frost, and Library Trustee, Dick Smith.).

The North Merrick Public Library Board was given an “Outstanding Trustees Award” today by the Library Trustees Association of New York. (Left to right: Tim Gavin, LTA Executive Director, Library Board President, Bill Pezzulo, Board VP, Marion Schurade, Library Director, Tom Witt, incoming Library Trustee, Kristin Frost, and Library Trustee, Dick Smith.).

Commune with Your Neighbors

The library offers many opportunities to commune with other members of the community. You may enjoy participating in a book discussion group, the monthly current events forum, or possibly the Friends of the Library.Details about how you might participate in these and other activities can be found on our online calendar and in our newsletter.


Attend Library Programs

The library offers a wide variety of programs that you may participate in. Programs that are offered include:Concerts, Cooking Demonstrations, Exercise Classes, Bus Trips,  and Driving Classes (that can lower your car insurance premium).


Reserve a Meeting Room

Meeting rooms may be reserved for times when the rooms are not already booked for library programs. Meeting rooms may be reserved for use by groups for educational, cultural, philanthropic, and civic purposes, and for nonpartisan political discussion programs. Meeting rooms shall not be available for commercial purposes. An application form to request a meeting room reservation can be accessed by contacting the library.


North Merrick orig photo

History

The first public library in the Merricks was founded in 1891 and consisted of about 50 books housed in a barn. The library was formally incorporated in 1897.

Although the Merrick Public Library was funded through tax dollars paid by the residents of Merrick, the library also offered its services initially for free to their neighbors in North Merrick. When the population of both Merrick and North Merrick grew substantially to eventually rival one another, the Merrick Public Library began to charge the residents of North Merrick a non-resident fee to use the library.

In response to the growing need for library services in the North Merrick community, the North Merrick Public Library was established by a community vote on November 21, 1964 and was granted a Provisional Charter on January 28, 1965.

The North Merrick Public Library initially opened as a storefront on December 5, 1965 at 1148 Merrick Avenue, and remained there for its first ten months. Then the newly formed library relocated to Meadowbrook School where it opened its doors on October 3, 1966.

The library celebrated its 50th year anniversary in 2016.

Merrick Library staff in 50 year celebration T-shirts holding a banner

Ask Joe Eisner: May a Library Board Meet Less Often…

LTA Members:Get Questions Answered
Do You Have a Library Question Which Requires an Answer?
Ask Joe Eisner (click to learn more)

As part of LTA’s expansion of service to aid and assist library trustees and directors, LTA offers members an opportunity to confer with Joe Eisner, free of charge.

Joe can be contacted toll-free at 1 (866) 720-8969 or by email at ltafaqjoe@librarytrustees.org. (Question are handled with discretion.)

For more information about Joe Eisner’s experience and background, please click on the “Ask Joe Eisner” tab under “Resources and Links” on LTA’s website.

Please note: The following should not be construed as legal advice, for which the services of counsel should be obtained:


The following should not be construed as legal advice, for which the services of counsel should be obtained.

Q. May an elected member of a school district  board of education simultaneously serve as elected member of the  school district public library?

 A. Yes. There is no incompatibility in such a situation: “One person may simultaneously serve as a member of a central school district board of education and as a trustee of a library created by that district” (1984 Op Atty Genl (Inf) 264). However, incompatibility of office would exist in the following situation: “A school district treasurer who ex officio acts as a treasurer of the school district public library may not at the same time occupy the office of trustee of such public library” (8 Op State Compt 414, 1960).

 Q. May a library board convene a “private meeting” at the home of a board member without public notice in order to discuss the performance of a staff member?

 A. No. Education Law s260-a mandates that boards of association and public libraries and library systems conduct all meetings in accordance with the provisions of the Open Meetings Law (OML). There is no provision in the OML which permits a library board to hold a “private meeting”, although it may hold an executive session for any of the eight  reasons specified in Public Officers Law s105(1) (a-g), one of which permits board discussion of a staff member’s performance.

 Thus, any board meeting must be held in a public place, except if the existence of an emergency situation involving unavailability of a public place would prevent this. Additionally,  local media must be notified, and if the library maintains a web site, notice of the date, time and place of the proposed meeting must also be listed on the website.

 An executive session may be may be entered into after the board first convenes in public session. The agenda for executive session  as well as the aforementioned notifications should note that the purpose of the meeting is to enter into executive session. At the public meeting a motion should then be made to enter into executive session. The motion should include the phrase  “to discuss the performance of a particular staff member”. Use of wording or a phrase such as “to discuss a personnel matter” is impermissible.

 When the board concludes its discussion in executive session, a motion must be made to adjourn such session. If no vote (formal action)  was taken, the minutes of the executive session may indicate that “No formal action was taken“’ If a vote is taken in  executive session, minutes would be required, but need not be verbatim. Any formal action would best be recorded in the minutes of the  subsequent public meeting following the session, or in a public meeting properly convened in accordance with the OML’s requirements.

  1.  I am aware that it is desirable that for other than “Ask Joe” submissions  which will be used as a blog, there is a 450 word limit, so if the total of the above two answers is more than 450 words combined, I suggest not printing the first question  and answer, reserving its use for a future date. Obviously, I’m hoping that the second q and a is 450 words or less, but I haven’t counted the words.

  2. If it is at all possible, without creating an undue burden,  can the above material be reproduced as submitted, that is with the bolded or italicized material left that way?

Please note: If you have any additional questions about this topic, please contact Joe Eisner at the e-mail/phone above.

 

The 2018 LTA Institute in Review:

Marriott Hotel, 101 James Doolittle Boulevard Uniondale, New York 11553

Library as Community: Know Your Aspirations, Plan for the Future
Friday, April 27, 2018
Registration with Cash Bar & Reception
followed by Dinner.

Adria Ripka, LTA President welcomed all to the TI followed by remarks from: Jacquelyn Thresher, Nassau Library System, Kevin Verbesey, Suffolk Cooperative Library System

And a memorial tribute to Bernie Margolis, State Librarian

Nate Hill

Institute Kick-Off Speaker: Nate Hill,Executive Director,Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) shared:

How Trustees Can Facilitate Innovation

And the evening ended with an After Hours: Long Island Author Panel::
Roland Allnach, Linda Maria Frank, and John Krahn.


Day 2:  Saturday, April 28, 2018
Registration and Continental Breakfast

These great presenters for the following workshops:


 Workshop I - The Iron is HOT
Libraries as Innovative & Dynamic Community Catalysts

Presenter: Mary Ann Carolan, MLS,
Director of Cornw

all Public Library


Workshop II - Sustainable Thinking:
Leading Your Library Forward in Uncertain Times

Presenter: Rebekkah Smith Aldrich

Coordinator for Library Sustainability, Mid-Hudson Library System

 Workshop III - Getting to the Next Stage of Community Support
Getting the Most of Out Advocacy and Fund Raising
Presenter: Libby Post
President, Communication Services
Member of American Library Association Advocacy Committee


Tim Burke NYLA President Upper Hudson Library System

Tim Burke NYLA President Upper Hudson Library System

Buffet Lunch was shared and the Recognition of Velma K. Moore Award Recipient:  ( see photo in drive)

Luncheon Speaker: Tim Burke, NYLA President (see photo in drive)

 The Institute finished the day by offering a Wrap Up Session:  What’s Your “Take Away?” ( see photo in photo section in drive)

Tribute to Bernard A. Margolis

Bernie in Library

"Bernie was a librarian's librarian. I will miss his good humor, steadfastness and commitment to make the world a better place through libraries" - Rebekkah Smith Aldrich

Bernard A. Margolis began serving as New York State Librarian and Assistant Commissioner for Libraries in January 2009. Reporting to the Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education, Mr. Margolis administered the New York State Research Library and the Division of Library Development. In partnership with the state’s 73 public and school library systems, the State Library delivers library services to 19.5 million people served by New York’s 7,000 academic, public, school and special libraries.

Benie Lookink at a book in the Lbrary - TImes Union

“Look at this building behind me,” he said. “It is the antidote. It is the medicine that we need. It is the light that brings knowledge to our children. It is the light that creates opportunities for people to aspire to things that they never thought they could achieve. It is the light that brings us together. That’s what this library stands for.” - Quote from Bernie

Mr. Margolis came to the State Library from his previous post as President of the Boston Public Library (BPL), Boston, Massachusetts, where he served from 1997 to 2008. The Boston Public Library is the oldest municipal public library in the country, with 27 neighborhood branches.

Bernie in front of Boston Public Library

“Bernie’s indomitable spirit will be sorely missed by all those who believe in the critical role that libraries play in their community." - Jeremy Johannson (NYLA)

His library experience includes management and executive positions in libraries and library systems in Colorado, Michigan and Massachusetts. Prior to moving to Boston, he served as Director/CEO of the Pikes Peak Library District in Colorado Springs from 1988 to 1997.

Bernie in Library by the New York Times

“Bernie was an outstanding library leader and a visionary. … The library community will miss his intelligence, eloquence, keen sense of humor and sage advice.” - STATEMENT FROM BOARD OF REGENTS CHANCELLOR BETTY A. ROSA AND COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION MARYELLEN ELIA

Mr. Margolis’ service includes a number of positions within the American Library Association including service as an elected member of the governing Council, leadership in the Association of Research Libraries, service as a professional delegate to the White House Conference on Libraries, and service on the boards of library organizations in Massachusetts,Colorado, and Michigan.

 


“Bernie was a librarian’s librarian. We were privileged to have someone in the role of New York State Library who so deeply believed in the core values of librarianship. His compass was always set in the right direction on behalf of New Yorkers. His deep seated commitment to intellectual freedom, patron privacy, access and diversity are a legacy to be proud of. I will miss his good humor, steadfastness and commitment to make the world a better place through libraries.”

From Rebekkah Smith Aldrich

 


NYLA response:
The New York Library Association (NYLA) is saddened to note the passing of New York State Librarian, Bernard “Bernie” A. Margolis on Saturday, April 14, 2018. Mr. Margolis served as the New York State Librarian and Assistant Commissioner for Libraries since January 2009. Mr. Margolis administered the New York State Research Library and the Division of Library Development. Working with New York State’s 73 public and school library systems, the State Library delivers library services to 19.5 million people served by New York’s 7,000 academic, public, school and special libraries.


Prior to becoming the New York State Librarian, Mr. Margolis served as the president of the Boston Public Library for 11 years where he expanded library hours, expanded children’s library services to every branch, created the nationally recognized Homework Assistance Program and online tutoring program, among many other accomplishments.


Due in part to his tireless advocacy and leadership in support of libraries, during Mr. Margolis’ tenure as NYS Librarian, New York State Library Aid increased by over $17M, and funding for the Library Construction Aid program increased to an all-time high of $34M.


“The library community has lost a stalwart champion,” commented Executive Director of the NY Library Association Jeremy Johannesen, who continued, “Bernie’s indominable spirit will be sorely missed by all those who believe in the critical role that libraries play in their community. We extend our deepest condolences to his wife, Amanda.”
In lieu of flowers, the family has requested that donations be made to your local library.


STATEMENT FROM BOARD OF REGENTS CHANCELLOR BETTY A. ROSA AND COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION MARYELLEN ELIA ON THE PASSING OF NEW YORK STATE LIBRARIAN BERNARD A. MARGOLIS:


“We are deeply saddened by the recent passing of Bernard A. Margolis, New York State Librarian and Assistant Commissioner for Libraries.


“Bernie was an outstanding library leader and a visionary. His expertise in library matters will be missed not only by the Board of Regents and the staff of the State Education Department, but across the State and the nation. His colleagues and friends at the Department and in the library community will miss his intelligence, eloquence, keen sense of humor and sage advice.


“Appointed State Librarian by the Board of Regents in January 2009, Bernie provided leadership and vision for the New York State Library, the state’s 73 library systems and New York’s 7,000 academic, public, school and special libraries.


“Bernie was very much looking forward to celebrating the State Library’s 200th Anniversary this month. Thanks to his vision and leadership, we have much to celebrate.


“Bernie accomplished much over the course of a long and successful career as a librarian and library leader. During his tenure at the New York State Library, state funding for public library construction more than doubled; participation in Summer Reading at New York Libraries grew to more than two million young people; and free public access internet and Wi-Fi are now available to patrons in all of New York’s public libraries. Of course, those are only some of the highlights of his exceptional tenure as New York State Librarian.


“Bernie came to the State Library from his previous post as President of the Boston Public Library, where he served from 1997 to 2008.


“We are so fortunate that Bernie chose to share with the public his lifelong love of books and learning. We are all better off because of his dedication and service to others.


PULISDO member

 

A native of Kew Gardens Hills, Bernie joined us last September in celebrating the official re-opening of our branch there following a major expansion and renovation.   Standing before a large crowd gathered outside the branch, he spoke passionately about the crucial role of public libraries in our society during an era of great uncertainty and change.

 

“Look at this building behind me,” he said. “It is the antidote. It is the medicine that we need. It is the light that brings knowledge to our children. It is the light that creates opportunities for people to aspire to things that they never thought they could achieve. It is the light that brings us together. That’s what this library stands for.”

 

Nick Buron

Chief Librarian, Queens Library”

Membership Drive

Whether your library is a small town soprano, a basso in the burbs, or a metropolitan mezzo, LTA serves as your choir, singing the praises of public libraries to legislators and locals alike. With your membership, our choir can get louder, reaching from the vaulted halls of Albany to every corner of the State. We need your support to do even more and to provide more services in 2018 so we can connect trustees throughout the state with the resources they need.

Thank you to all of you who renewed in 2017! Your support made a huge difference. But we need everyone’s help.

Every new year is more important than the last for New York State Libraries, because now is the only time we can all do something to strengthen them. The 756 libraries and 23 systems in our state need your best efforts as trustees to succeed as one of the linchpins of our communities.

LTA is the only organization dedicated to supporting the work of library trustees. Through education, support materials, resources provided through our website, and opportunities to speak peer to peer, LTA enables your community to be better served..

Connecting:. . . .

LTA brings trustees together from all around the state to our events, from Suffolk to St. Lawrence, and Columbia to Chautauqua, where we discuss the concerns of the smallest association libraries to the largest municipals. We also connect with other organizations, legislators, and educational providers and try to do the same for you and your local libraries.

Advocating:

Unifies the voices of all NYS libraries into a powerful call to action to our state legislators Strengthens local advocacy efforts within your own communities

Recognizing:

Highlights the work of exceptional trustees and friends of our libraries
Showcases systems and libraries around the state

Educating:

provides new trustees with opportunities for free seminars
educates seasoned trustees with monthly emails updates and resources
supports resources like our regularly updated website and policy database

That is our mission: connecting through advocacy, recognition, and education, and part of how we C.A.R.E.

Although we had tremendous momentum this year, with you we can accomplish even more. Our goal is to reach 450 member libraries in 2018 which is less than 50 more libraries than were members in 2017.

Today we invite you to please consider joining your library in LTA. Considering the guidance needed in addressing library concerns, there may not be a more significant time for your participation to allow for the united effort of LTA.