National Library Legislative Day

New York’s Libraries Information Network <NYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOV>; on behalf of; Robert Hubsher <rhubsher@RCLS.ORG>

Good morning all,

As the New York State National Library Legislative Day (NLLD) Coordinator I want to urge you to join the New York State delegation traveling to Washington DC for the 2016 NLLD. The event will be held on May 2, 2016 at the Liaison Hotel and May 3 when we will be meeting with our Senators and Representatives. There is also a training session for first time NLLD delegates to be held on May 1 from 3:00pm to 5:00pm at the ALA Washington Office headquarters (1615 New Hampshire Avenue NW).

NLLD brings hundreds of librarians, trustees, library supporters, and patrons to Washington, D.C. to meet with their Members of Congress to rally support for libraries issues and policies. As with previous years, participants will receive advocacy tips and training, along with important issue briefings prior to their meetings. The Washington Office is still working on the legislative issue briefings. I will send out a link to the briefings as soon as they are available.

Participants at National Library Legislative Day are able to take advantage of a discounted room rate by booking at the Liaison (for the nights of May 1st and 2nd). To register for the event and find hotel registration information, please visit http://www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/nlld.

For those who find the cost of staying at the Liaison Hotel too high here is a link to hotels that are either in Washington DC or in nearby Virginia with ready access to the Metro which comes into Union Station, not far from the Liaison Hotel or the legislative office buildings:
http://www.yourdchotels.com/washington-dc-area-map.aspx

Want to see a little more? Check out the video from last year!

The ALA Washington Office and the White House Conference on Library and Information Services Taskforce (WHCLIST) offer a scholarship opportunity to a non-librarian participant at National Library Legislative Day. Recipients of the WHCLIST Award receive a stipend of $300 and two free nights at a D.C. hotel. The deadline for submissions is April 1, 2016. For more information about the WHCLIST Award, visit http://www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/nlld/funding.

Your firsthand library experience – as a librarian or as a patron – is an invaluable part of helping legislators to understand the impact that libraries have in the day to day lives of their constituents. I hope you will consider joining us!

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.

Robert Hubsher
Executive Director
Ramapo Catskill Library System (RCLS)
619 Route 17M Middletown, NY, 10940-4395
Telephone: 845-243-3747 extension 242
Fax: 845-243-3739
mailto:rhubsher@rcls.org
http://www.rcls.org

15th Annual Library of Congress National Book Festival

New York’s Libraries Information Network

on behalf of; DLD (DLD@NYSED.GOV)
NYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOV
DPTV-PBS To Provide Live Online Coverage of

September 5, 2015—Noon to 6 p.m.

Partnership made possible by the Wyncote Foundation Yesterday’s Washington Post article
Press Release on BookViewNow: 

In less than three weeks, Detroit Public Television will head to Washington, DC to bring book lovers nationwide extensive coverage of the 15th Annual Library of Congress National Book Festival — an annual literary event that brings together best-selling authors and thousands of book fans for author talks, panel discussions, book signings and other activities. It was created by Laura Bush and Librarian of Congress James H. Billington at the suggestion of Mrs. Bush, who had created the Texas Book Festival.

Coverage of this event is important for several reasons: It allows the Library of Congress to share the book festival with hundreds of thousands of people all over the country and even the world, who cannot otherwise attend it. It also provides a trusted and important venue for esteemed authors such as David

McCollough, Tom Brokaw, Louise Erdrich, Kwame Alexander, Marilynne Robinson, and others to discuss their books and share their stories with audiences nationwide.

Most importantly, it uses the power of PBS’ Book View Now to reinforce the love of reading and books with audiences of all ages and backgrounds—not just on the day of the event, but for many weeks to follow — allowing readers to enjoy the interviews and information at their leisure.

Live stream coverage will be available online via PBS.org and at www. BookViewNow.org, plus select PBS station websites, and the WORLDChannel.org. In addition, select segments will be archived and available for on-demand viewing on PBS.org, PBS station websites and all PBS video apps, including iPhone, iPad, Xbox, Roku and Apple TV, as well as YouTube.

In addition to The National Book Festival, PBS’ Book View Now has covered the Miami Book Fair International, the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, Book Expo America, and BookCon. Each event has drawn more interest from viewers and great feedback about PBS’ efforts in this area.

Visit www.bookviewnow.org and check out our coverage of past book events, and join us as we continue to grow this momentum and build the energy about books and the publishing industry.

Rich Homberg
President and CEO
Detroit Public Television
248-640-4169
@RichHomberg – rhomberg@dptv.org

IMLS 2012 Public Libraries Survey Report Issued

New York’s Libraries Information Network [NYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOV]; on behalf of; DLD [DLD@NYSED.GOV]

NYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOV

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 26, 2015IMLS Press Contact
202-653-4799
Giuliana Bullard, gbullard@imls.gov

IMLS 2012 Public Libraries Survey Report Issued

Washington, DC—In 2012, Americans made 1.5 billion trips to public libraries in the United States—the equivalent of more than 4.1 million visits each day, according to new research by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The research indicates there is still a high demand for the resources and services of the nation’s approximately 9,000 public libraries.

Today, IMLS released the report for the Public Libraries in the United States Survey: Fiscal Year 2012, an analysis of the most comprehensive annual data collection of U.S. public library statistics. Ninety-seven percent of public libraries in the 50 states and the District of Columbia contribute data for the survey, which is now in its 26th year. The survey report provides analysis of 13 key indicators of library investments and library use, and profiles for each state, theDistrict of Columbia, andPuerto Rico. Policymakers and practitioners use the report findings to make informed decisions about library support and management.

Fiscal Year 2012 was marked by a stabilization of post-recession declines in revenue, staffing, visitation, and circulation at the nation’s public libraries. Measures of public library use and resources remained similar to prior year levels. While revenue has stabilized, a greater share is coming from local governments, and in FY 2012, there was a 13.2 percent increase in revenues from other sources.

Libraries are offering more public programs, including programs for children, and are seeing greater program attendance than in previous years. Public libraries are also adding more to their digital holdings, including e-books and downloadable audio and video. Spending on electronic materials has doubled since Fiscal Year 2003. Although libraries continue to provide public access computers and Internet access, use of public access computers has seen a two-year decrease of 7.4 percent. The decrease may be the result of customers’ use of their own devices such as laptops, smart phones, and tablets to connect to public libraries’ Wi-Fi.

“The public library is adapting to the changing needs of the American people,” said Maura Marx, Acting IMLS Director. “The report describes shifts in funding, as well as changes in the services and programs of public libraries that reflect changes in public demand.”

She continued, “We found positive links between investments—particularly in staffing and collections—and public library usage. When a library has more full-time staff members, it is visitedmore often.  When it spends more on electronic materials, it increases its per capita circulation. So, we clearly see a strong connection between investment and usage. At IMLS, we are proud to be the nation’s primary source of federal support for public libraries and to know that our investments make a real difference for these essential public institutions.”

Other highlights of the findings include:

  • There were 1.5 billion in-person visits to public libraries across theUnitedStates, similar to FY 2011 levels. This was a 10-year increase of 10.2 percent.
  • The public investedover $11.5 billion in revenue to public libraries. This was similar to FY 2011 levels, after adjusting for inflation. Revenue has declined after a peak in FY 2009, but is up 7.2 percent over 10 years.
  • More than 92.6 million people attended the 4.0 million programs at public libraries. Attendance showed a 1-year increase of 5.2 percent and a 10-year increase of 54.4 percent.

See other highlights featured in the Factsheet, and access the full report here.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

 

National Library Legislative Day 2015

New York’s Libraries Information Network [NYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOV] Jeremy Johannesen [director@NYLA.ORG]
Good news! Registration for the 41st annual National Library Legislative Day is now open!

This two-day advocacy event brings hundreds of librarians, trustees, library supporters, and patrons to Washington, D.C. to meet with their members of Congress rally support for libraries issues and policies.

Registration information and hotel booking information are available on the ALA Washington Office website. This year, National Library Legislative Day will be held May 4-5, 2015. Participants will receive advocacy tips and training, along with important issues briefings prior to their meetings.

First-time participants are eligible for a unique scholarship opportunity. The White House Conference on Library and Information Services Taskforce (WHCLIST) and the ALA Washington Office are calling for nominations for the 2015 WHCLIST Award. Recipients of this award receive a stipend ($300 and two free nights at a D.C. hotel) to a non-librarian participant in National Library Legislative Day.

For more information about the WHCLIST award or National Library Legislative Day, visit www.ala.org/nlld. Questions or comments can be directed to grassroots coordinator Lisa Lindle at Llindle@alawash.org.

IMLS Awards $9.2 Million to Improve Library Service in US

NNYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOVew York’s Libraries Information Network [NYLINE@LISTSERV.NYSED.GOV]

IMLS Awards $9.2 Million to Improve Library Services in the U.S.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 11, 2014

IMLS Press Contact
202-653-4799
Giuliana Bullard, gbullard@imls.gov

IMLS Awards $9.2 Million to Improve Library Services in the U.S.

Washington, DC-The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) today announced grants for 51 library projects, totaling $9,291,441, that will advance library and archives practice by addressing challenges in the field and by testing and evaluating innovations.

The projects were selected from 212 applications through the IMLS National Leadership Grants for Libraries and Sparks! Ignition Grants for Libraries programs, requesting more than $14.6 million and matched with $7,154,135 in non-federal funds. This announcement includes three grants through the Laura Bush 21st Century Library Program, which total $647,821.

For a complete list of the recipients, see www.imls.gov/news/2014_ols_nlg_and_sparks_annoucement.aspx.

“Libraries are changing to meet the evolving learning, social, and informational landscapes of their communities. These grants reflect truly creative thinking by library and archive professionals-along with their university, professional association, and local government partners-that will ensure the continued role of libraries as community anchors for generations to come,” said IMLS Director Susan H. Hildreth.

National Leadership Grants for Libraries (NLG) support projects that address challenges faced by the library and archive fields. Successful projects have the potential to improve library services nationwide. Grantees generate results such as new tools, research findings, models, services, practices, or alliances that can be widely used, adapted, scaled, or replicated to extend the benefits of federal investment.

Grantee projects address a variety of topics of importance for libraries and archives, and include:

  • $489,115 to the University of Michigan for copyright determinations work for the Copyright Review Management System. In addition to developing a toolkit for use by libraries worldwide, the project will work with HathiTrust and its partners to sustain the copyright determination process.

  • $249,263 to Arizona State University to help public libraries support entrepreneurs and economic development. Through the Alexandria Co-Working Network (ALEX) the grantee will provide public programming about technical and software skills and training for library staff about programming and partnerships.

  • $250,000 to the Educopia Institute, the MetaArchive Cooperative, and their university partners to address a national need for preserving and making available supplemental research data and complex digital objects that accompany Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) submissions. Their project will create guidance briefs, a curation workbench, and a workshop series to train ETD stakeholders.

  • $499,967 to the New York City Department of Education to build a digital gateway for students and teachers for STEM resources and instructional content and programs about environmental science.

  • $500,000 to Portland State University and the Multnomah County Library to study library practices, programs, and services for adults with low literacy skills.

Sparks! Ignition Grants for Libraries are small grants that support the deployment, testing, and evaluation of promising and groundbreaking new tools, products, services, or organizational practices of libraries and archives. The grants awarded include:

  • $24,983 to Cañada College and its public library and county education partners for workshops, online tutorials and one-on-one support to help early childhood education students increase their understanding of STEM (Science, Technology, Education, and Mathematics)

  • $25,000 to Michigan State University to create a web interface prototype for to promote understanding of Ojibwe and Cherokee language manuscripts and key linguistic feature of those languages.

  • $23,544 to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Digital Project Unit and its YMCA partner to provide hands-on archival training to at-risk youth in a project to catalog and digitally preserve historic community materials, including from local African American neighborhoods.

For more information about IMLS grant programs, see www.imls.gov/applicants/available_grants.aspx.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Happy 75th anniversary of the Library Bill of Rights!

New York’s Libraries Information Network [NYLINE@listserv.nysed.gov]; on behalf of; DLD [DLD@MAIL.NYSED.GOV]

NYLINE@listserv.nysed.gov

[NYLINE] Happy 75th anniversary of the Library Bill of Rights!

June 19, 2014

Happy 75th anniversary of the Library Bill of Rights!

Today we are pleased to commemorate the75th anniversaryof ALA’s adoption of theLibrary Bill of Rightson June 19, 1939 at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. The document – which is the basis for the work of the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom – was created in the wake of several incidents of banning The Grapes of Wrathby John Steinbeck in the late 1930s. It also was inspired by the rising tide of totalitarianism around the world.

 

 

The first iteration of the Library Bill of Rights was a statement by the head of the Des Moines, Iowa, Public Library, Forrest Spaulding. It was adopted as policy by that library on November 21, 1938. Much of the wording remained the same for ALA’s version, although it was more universal.

 

Since its initial adoption, the Library Bill of Rights has been amended four times. There are alsoover 20 official interpretationson issues ranging from Meeting Rooms to Labeling and Ratings Systems. Many of these interpretations have Q&As associated with them to assist library boards and administrators adapt the policies to their specific circumstances.

To honor the Library Bill of Rights, take some time to read it and consider its meaning and relevance lo these many decades later. And if you’re on social media, share this post!

Jonathan Kelley

Program Officer

Office for Intellectual Freedom

American Library Association

50 E. Huron St.

Chicago, IL 60611

As the Library Bill of Rights celebrates its birthday, read in the Handbook for Library Trustees of New York State (2010 edition) the current Document as reaffirmed in 1996 by the ALA Council.


 

Library Bill of Rights

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries that make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

ALA Welcomes Open Internet Bill

New York’s Libraries Information Network [NYLINE@listserv.nysed.gov]; on behalf of; Robert Hubsher [rhubsher@RCLS.ORG]

NYLINE@listserv.nysed.gov

[NYLINE] ALA Welcomes Open Internet Bill

Good afternoon all,

Below is copy of a press release from the American Library Association (ALA) in response to the Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2014 a bill introduced by Representative Doris Matusi (D – CA). This bill if passed would protect the open Internet (net neutrality).

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The American Library Association (ALA) is rallying librarians to support the Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2014, a bill that would prohibit paid prioritization over the Internet. Introduced today, Rep. Doris Matsui (D – CA), the legislation would prohibit Internet service providers giving preferential treatment to the traffic of online content, applications, services, or devices.

ALA President Barbara Stripling responded today to the introduction of the net neutrality bill:

“An open and innovative Internet is essential to our nation’s freedom of speech, educational achievement and economic growth. Librarians in public, school, and academic libraries are dedicated to preserving the free flow of information over the public Internet, which is why the Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2014 is vitally important to preserving this cherished freedom. The American Library Association enthusiastically endorses the bill.

“The Internet must continue to serve as a primary, open platform for information exchange, intellectual discourse, civic engagement, creativity, research, innovation, teaching and learning. The beauty of the open Internet is that every individual or entity, including libraries, can be both users and providers of information and Internet content. Unfortunately, paid prioritization allows only those who can pay more to maximize the Internet’s many benefits. We are deeply concerned that public broadband providers have financial incentives to interfere with the openness of the Internet by granting favorable transmission to their affiliated content providers or by discriminating against particular Internet applications based on the content of the information or the type of service being provided.

“The ALA remains steadfastly committed to the Open Internet. We will work collaboratively with libraries and educational institutions nationwide to advocate for strong public policies enforce network neutrality and prohibit paid prioritization. It is critical for all to have equitable access to the Internet to support our nation’s social, cultural, educational and economic well-being.”

###

About the American Library Association

The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 57,000 members in academic, public, school, government, and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

Robert Hubsher

Executive Director

Ramapo Catskill Library System (RCLS)

619 Route 17M Middletown, NY, 10940-4395

Telephone: 845-243-3747 extension 242

Fax: 845-243-3739

mailto:rhubsher@rcls.org

http://www.rcls.org