Urgent: NYS Library Aid FY 2017-2018 – Needs Your Support!

NYS Library Aid FY 2017-2018 – Needs Your Support!
KEEP THE MESSAGE GOING – PASS IT ON!

As the final budget is being crafted the NYS Senate and NYS Assembly one house budget proposals remain on the chopping block!

TAKE ACTION NOW! Use NYLA’s pre-drafted letter to voice your support for fully funding NYS Library Aid in the FY 2017-2018 Budget.

Even if you have already written to your representative, please follow this link to send this NEW message to your legislators that library funding is NOT NEGOTIABLE!

Senate

  • State Library Aid: +$8M over Governor’s Executive Budget ($99.6M total)
  • State Library Construction Aid: +$15M ($29M total)

Assembly

  • State Library Aid: +$4M ($95.6M total)
  • State Library Construction Aid: +$11M ($25M total)

These adds are a testament to the hard work and commitment of New York’s library advocates. Thanks to your efforts, we currently have support in each house heading into final negotiations with the Governor. But, remember these numbers are mere proposals, and nothing is assured. Unless we convince the legislature to dig in and defend library funding, we still face Governor Cuomo’s funding cuts!

WE NEED YOUR HELP TO DEFEND LIBRARY FUNDING – NOW IS THE TIME TO ACT! We are counting on you to ensure the legislature fights for libraries as negotiations take shape.

TAKE ACTION NOW! Use NYLA’s pre-drafted letter to voice your support for fully funding NYS Library Aid in the FY 2017-2018 Budget.

Even if you have already written to your representative, please follow this link to send this NEW message to your legislators that library funding is NOT NEGOTIABLE!

After you submit your name and address you will have the opportunity to view and EDIT our pre-drafted letter.  Our system determines your elected representatives based on your address, and submits your message directly to their inbox. Copies are also sent to key members of the Legislature.

Click HERE to send your message of support for Library Funding NOW!

If you have already sent your letter – THANK YOU!
Help us spread the word – invite your coworkers, friends, and family to take action!
Forward this message, share, post, tweet – pass it on!

EVERY MESSAGE COUNTS.


 

 

Third Annual “Library Programs Symposium” (Sept 30)

Do you find yourself coming up short on good programming ideas?

Looking for creative program opportunities for your library, school or social group?

Want to meet some presenters and performers who can fill your programming void?

Answers to these question can be found at the . . .

 Third Annual Library ProgramsSymposium

September 30, 2016 / 12:30 - 2:30 pm / University at Albany, Campus Center Assembly Hall 

We are bringing new and innovative types of programming information to libraries, schools and other institutions across the Capital District region and beyond. This event features exhibits of programs from educational, entertainment, social, and cultural programming specialists. These informative displays will highlight presentations and demonstrations that will focus on education, entertainment, and cultural awareness, creating new programming opportunities to bring back to your institution. And it’s FREE.

This year’s Programs2 Symposium includes over 40 presenters who offer a variety of programs, workshops, classes and demonstrations. We will also have fabulous door prizes and light refreshments.

Please go to our website for additional information: http://libraryprogramssquared.wordpress.com/

Who is this “We”, anyway?

We are the University at Albany IST666 class for summer 2016. We are all graduate students in the Information Science program at the University at Albany and will one day be planning our own educational programming at institutions similar to yours.

An RSVP would be nice (not necessary) either to cgermain@albany.edu (our instructor) or via the RSVP link athttp://libraryprogramssquared.wordpress.com/

See you on September 30th!

Generous Sponsorship from : University Auxiliary Services, UA Graduate Student Association, and the CEAS Department of Information Studies

Ask Joe Eisner: What are the recent changes in the Open Meetings Law regarding the notice requirements for publicizing a board meeting?

LTA Members:Get Questions Answered
Do You Have a Library Question Which Requires an Answer?
Ask Joe Eisner (click to learn more)

As part of LTA’s expansion of service to aid and assist library trustees and directors, LTA offers members an opportunity to confer with Joe Eisner, free of charge.

Joe can be contacted toll-free at 1 (866) 720-8969 or by email at ltafaqjoe@librarytrustees.org. (Question are handled with discretion.)

For more information about Joe Eisner’s experience and background, please click on the “Ask Joe Eisner” tab under “Resources and Links” on LTA’s website.

Please note: The following should not be construed as legal advice, for which the services of counsel should be obtained:

Question: What are the changes in the recent amendment to the Open Meetings Law in regard to the notice requirements for publicizing a library board meeting?

Answer: Education Law s260-a requires public and association libraries, and library systems, to convene, provide public notification,  and to conduct board meetings in compliance with the Open Meetings Law. Governor Cuomo signed into law on September 9, 2016, effective immediately, an amendment to Public Officers Law s104 regarding notification to the media of such meetings,  providing electronic transmission as a permissible alternative method of public notification [amendments underlined]:

  1. Public notice of the time and place of a meeting scheduled at least one  week  prior thereto shall be given or electronically transmitted to the news media and shall be conspicuously posted in one or  more  designated public locations at least seventy-two hours before such meeting.
  2. Public notice of the time and place of every other meeting shall be given  or  electronically transmitted, to the extent practicable, to the,news media and shall be conspicuously posted in one or  more  designated,public locations at a reasonable time prior thereto.
  3. If  a  meeting will be streamed live over the internet, the public, notice for the meeting shall inform the public of the  internet  address of the website streaming such meeting.  

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately.

In an accompanying memorandum, the sponsors of this amendment stated:

Municipal governments are required to publish meeting notices in a designated newspaper of general circulation. The continued and increased availability of web-site publications provides an alternate [emphasis added], reliable and easy method whereby every citizen can download, examine and print from any website or computer from home, local library or Wi-Fi available location.

 

Citizens who do not have computers at home, can access the information at their libraries at no cost. Many citizens prefer acquiring news about their community through websites on the Internet rather than print newspapers. Younger citizens are more familiar with the Internet because of an early and consistent exposure to computers, and feel very comfortable going online to download information rather than reading newspapers.

 

Technology is transforming the way in which government interacts with its citizens. Municipalities should have the option of an electronic means for citizens to access municipal notices.

Please note: If you have any additional questions about this topic, please contact Joe Eisner at the e-mail/phone above.

 

You’re Invited! “Trustees in the Know” by LTA & Nioga Library System

Registration Deadline: August 5  Registration Form

LTA is honored to partner with the Nioga Library System to continue the dialogue begun at the May LTA Institute at Plattsburgh.

Trustees in the Know
An evening to Learn, Participate and Recharge for Library Trustees and Directors
Sponsored by the Library Trustees Association & the Nioga Library System

Funding is provided by LTA & Nioga Library System — open invitation to all trustees and directors. The event is hosted by the Richmond Memorial Library.

Hosted by:
Richmond Memorial Library
19 Ross Street
Batavia, NY 14020
Wednesday, August 10, 2016   4:00 – 8:00 PM

Join us to for two presentations:

  • Productive Meetings We All Need Them, by Ron Kirsop, Assistant Director, Pioneer Library System
  • A Financial Primer – Trustees Fiscal & Legal Responsibilities and External & Internal Audits, by Brie Harrison, Finance Director, Monroe County Library System
Program specifics and presenter bios are below . . .

Program Schedule:
4:00 – 4:15 Registration
4:15 – 5:30 Productive Meetings
5:30 – 6:30 Light Supper and Networking
6:30 – 7:45 A Financial Primer

What can library trustees do between monthly board meetings to enhance their knowledge of library services and legal and fiduciary responsibilities?

Just as libraries reflect and respond to their communities, LTA is committed to addressing specific trustee education needs through additional regional offerings.

RSVP by August 5  Registration Form  (preferred)
or send an e-mail to: intheknow@librarytrustees.org (include name, position/title, library, system, and note if you are an LTA member)

We hope trustees will take advantage of this opportunity,and use it as a mechanism to shape public library services throughout the region.

Presentation Details

First Presentation: Productive Board Meetings

The most effective boards focus their time and energy on the few issues that make the biggest impact on the future of their library. To do this, boards need to use their limited meeting time as productively as possible. In this presentation, Ron Kirsop, Assistant Director of the Pioneer Library System, will talk about meeting preparation, common meeting difficulties, and other topics that can help improve the effectiveness of your monthly meetings.

Ron Kirsop is the Assistant Director of the Pioneer Library System, a cooperative system in western New York serving 42 small and rural libraries. His focus is in user experience , customer service, strategic planning, and human resources.

Second Presentation: A Financial Primer

Overview of best practices for Boards with respect to budgeting, investments and expenses.  Guidelines on thresholds for financial reviews, audits and recent NYS Comptroller’s recommended actions from procedural audits.

Brie Harrison is the Finance Director for the Monroe County Library System (MCLS) and Rochester Public Library, overseeing $20 million in annual operating and capital budgets as well as $3.5 million in endowment (trust) investments.  She has provided prior training and support to the MCLS and Pioneer Library System in the areas of facilities management, cash handling, auditing and procurement standards.

 

 

 

Both speakers bring a wealth of public library knowledge and general expertise to the table. Trustees will have an opportunity to ask questions. For more information about this event, please visit the www.librarytrustees.org. Online registration is also available through this link.

Download Flier

Check the Membership Directory tab on the home page and Join or Renew if your membership for 2016 has not yet been completed.

Your membership contributions fund LTA programs throughout the year. We need you to do what we do.

Are you an LTA member? If yes, forms for The Certified Trustee Program will be available to record the event for CONTINUING EDUCATION credits.

Not sure? Check Membership and if not, please renew or join LTA today.

Please noteLTA is in the process of re-vamping it’s Continuing Education program, but any credits obtained for this event will be retained.

If you have any questions, please send an e-mail to intheknow@librarytrustees.org or call 518-445-9505.

Friends of Libraries Section Daniel W. Casey Award

FLS Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award

Sponsored by the Friends of Libraries Section of NYLA

The Friends of Libraries Section is proud to continue the long-standing tradition of the Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award.  This annual recognition has been given every year since 1993 by the Empire Friends Roundtable, now the Friends of Libraries Section. The Casey Award honors a volunteer member or a group of the library community whose efforts have contributed to the growth of libraries or Friends of the Library organizations.

Call for nominations:

The  deadline for submission of nominations for this prestigious award is July 1.
It’s not too soon to be thinking about a worthy recipient.  The nomination form is available here.

2015 Award Recipient

This year marks the first time that the Friends of Libraries Section will honor a library volunteer with the Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award. This recognition has a 22 yearlong history with the Empire Friends Roundtable, now FLS.

The Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award, sponsored by FLS, honors a volunteer member or a group of the library community whose efforts have contributed to the growth of libraries or Friends of the Library organizations. We are pleased to announce that this year’s award will be given posthumously to Don Riplinger of the Friends & Foundation of the Rochester Public Library (FFRPL).

See the complete story about Don in the FLS September 2015 newsletter.
Read about the plaque presentation in the FLS December 2015 newsletter on page 4.

Who was Daniel W. Casey

Dan Casey & Gov. CareyDan Casey (1921-1995), a resident of Solvay, New York, was known as “Mr. Library” for his tireless advocacy on behalf of libraries at international, national, state, county, and local levels.

Dan paved the way for libraries in legislative and other government offices with his persistence in stating his belief in libraries and in better library services.  His involvement in libraries began with his appointment to the Solvay Public Library’s Board of Trustees in 1954.  From that beginning, he went on to become President of the Solvay Public Library Board, the New York State Association of Library Boards (NYSALB), and the American Library Trustee Association.  He was an honorary Life Member of the New York Library Association.

Dan served on several statewide library committees under Governors Hugh Carey and Mario Cuomo.  Presidents Richard M. Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush named him to the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Informational Services.  In 1988, Dan was appointed chair of the Commission.

Dan also gave his service to other boards including the Onondaga County Public Library, Central New York Library Resources Council, Syracuse University Library Associates, and the Empire Friends Roundtable.

In 1995, the Empire Friends added to the awards Dan had received by a posthumous presentation of the EFR “Library Advocacy Award.” The award was renamed the Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award in memory of Dan to honor him for being an effective library advocate for 41 years.

Photo provided by the New York State Library.  Manuscripts and Special Collections.  New York Library Association Records, 1890-1986 (SC 14879).

Do you know of an individual or group that is deserving of this award?

Please submit your nomination for the Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award by July 1st. The nomination form is available here.

Recipients of the FLS Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award

2015   Don Riplinger, volunteer, Friends & Foundation of the Rochester Public Library (FFRPL)

Recipients of the EFR Daniel W. Casey Library Advocacy Award

1993    Robert J. Trudell, NYLA President 1991
1994    Michael J. Bragman, State Assemblyman
1995    Daniel W. Casey, Solvay Public Library
1996    Friends of the Utica Public Library
1997    Joan C. Silverstein, Westchester Library System
1998    Friends of Middletown Thrall Library
1999    Friends of Oswego Library
2000    Friends of the Shenendehowa Public Library
2001    Harold J. Wusterbarth, Mohawk Valley Library Association
2002    Nicholas J. Pirro, County Executive, Onondaga County
2003    Friends of the Rochester Public Library
2004    Friends of the Macedon Public Library
2005    Helen Marshall, Queens Borough President
2006    Hugh Lee, Bovina Public Library
2007    David Cooper, Friends of the Bethlehem Public Library
2008    Dennis Mosley, Friends of the Albany Public Library
2009    Friends of the Orchard Park Public Library
2010    Robert Manning, Baldwinsville Public Library
2011    Friends of the Red Hook Public Library
2012    Frank Van Zanten, Friends of the Poughkeepsie Public Library District
2013    Janet Dempsey, Friends of Cornwall Library
2014    Building Preservation Committee, Aurora Free Library

Read about the work of the Aurora Free Library Building Preservation Committee in this article published inThe Auburn Citizen

Ask Joe: May a library board authorize the use of credit cards by patrons?

LTA Members:Get Questions Answered
Do You Have a Library Question Which Requires an Answer?
Ask Joe Eisner (click to learn more)

As part of LTA’s expansion of service to aid and assist library trustees and directors, LTA offers members an opportunity to confer with Joe Eisner, free of charge.

Joe can be contacted toll-free at 1 (866) 720-8969 or by email at ltafaqjoe@librarytrustees.org. (Question are handled with discretion.)

For more information about Joe Eisner’s experience and background, please click on the “Ask Joe Eisner” tab under “Resources and Links” on LTA’s website.

Please note: The following should not be construed as legal advice, for which the services of counsel should be obtained:

Question . . .   May a library board authorize the use of credit cards by patrons to pay fines, fees and other charges incurred?

Answer . . .  Yes.

Public libraries- General Municipal Law s10(a) includes public libraries in the definition of local governments subject to the General Municipal Law. As such, these governing boards may, by local law, ordinance or resolution “…determine that it is in the public interest and authorize such local government to enter into agreements with one or more financing agencies or card issuers to provide  for the acceptance…, by such officers of the local government of credit cards as a means of payment of fines, civil penalties…fees, charges,  [and] revenue….owed to the local overnment….” General Municipal Law s5(b).

The statute further provides that  the governing board,  in enacting a local law, ordinance or resolution, “…shall designate which of its officers charged with the duty of collecting or receiving moneys in behalf of local government, shall be authorized to accept credit cards as a means of payment of “…fines, rates, fees, charges, revenue, financial obligations and other amounts, including penalties….” (General Municipal Law s5(g)).

Association libraries- while not subject to the General Municipal , in accordance with the provisions of Education Law s226(10), boards of such libraries have the power to

Make all by-laws and rules necessary  and  proper  for  the   purposes of the institution and not inconsistent with law or any rule of   the  university; but no rule by which more than a majority vote shall be   required for any specified action by  the  trustees  shall  be  amended,,  suspended  or  repealed  by a smaller vote than that required for action,  there under (Education Law s226(10)).

If an association library board determines that it would be in the public interest to accept credit card payments for fines, fees and other library charges, it would be prudent to consult with library counsel for assistance in implementing this goal.

Please note: If you have any additional questions about this topic, please contact Joe Eisner at the e-mail/phone above.

Ask Joe: Is the library responsible if on a public access computer a patron displays a picture which is deemed “offensive  sexual material” by others who view it?

LTA Members:Get Questions Answered
Do You Have a Library Question Which Requires an Answer?
Ask Joe Eisner (click to learn more)

As part of LTA’s expansion of service to aid and assist library trustees and directors, LTA offers members an opportunity to confer with Joe Eisner, free of charge.

Joe can be contacted toll-free at 1 (866) 720-8969 or by email at ltafaqjoe@librarytrustees.org. (Question are handled with discretion.)

For more information about Joe Eisner’s experience and background, please click on the “Ask Joe Eisner” tab under “Resources and Links” on LTA’s website.

The following should not be construed as legal advice, for which the services of counsel should be obtained:

Question . . .  Is the library responsible if on a public access computer a patron displays a picture which is deemed “offensive  sexual material” by others who view it?

The following should not be construed as legal advice, for which the service of counsel should be sought.

Answer . . .  No.  Display of such material is a Penal Law offense:

Public display of offensive sexual material.

A  person  is  guilty  of  public display of offensive sexual material when, with knowledge of  its  character  and  content,  he  displays  or permits  to  be  displayed  in  or  on  any window, showcase, newsstand, display rack, wall, door,  billboard,  display  board,  viewing  screen, moving picture screen, marquee or similar place, in such manner that the display  is  easily  visible from or in any:  public street, sidewalk or thoroughfare;  transportation  facility;  or  any  place  accessible  to members  of  the  public  without  fee  or  other  limit or condition of admission such as a  minimum  age  requirement  and  including  but  not limited  to  schools,  places  of  amusement,  parks and playgrounds but excluding  rooms  or  apartments  designed  for  actual  residence;  any pictorial,  three-dimensional or other visual representation of a person or a portion of the human body that predominantly  appeals  to  prurient interest in sex, and that:

(a)   depicts  nudity,  or  actual  or  simulated  sexual  conduct  or sado-masochistic abuse; or

(b) depicts or appears to depict nudity, or actual or simulated sexual  conduct or sado-masochistic abuse, with the area of the male  or  female subject’s  unclothed  or  apparently  unclothed  genitals, pubic area or   buttocks, or of the female subject’s unclothed or  apparently  unclothed   breast,  obscured by a covering or mark placed or printed on or in front   of the material displayed, or obscured or altered in any other manner.  Public display of offensive sexual material is a Class A misdemeanor (Penal Law s245.11).

If a person displays offensive sexual material in a library on a public access computer, the library is not responsible. Monitoring what patrons do or display on a public terminal is a form of censorship. Some libraries display a sign stating that display of such material is a violation of Penal Law s245.11,  which as indicated above, is a Class A misdemeanor for which prosecution can result.

However, a library cannot prosecute violators. If a patron has observed such an incident, the library staff can offer the patron the use of the library’s phone to call the police to respond.  If the violator is still present and still actively displaying such material when the officer responds,  if the person who reported the episode is willing to lodge a complaint, it will be up to the officer to decide how to proceed.

Please note: If you have any additional questions about this topic, please contact Joe Eisner at the e-mail/phone above.

INVITATION – Summer Reading at New York Libraries Presentation at the Monday June 13 Board of Regents Meeting

From NYLINE:

June 9, 2016

Directors of Library Systems in New York State

Directors of Public and Association Libraries in New York State

Public Library System Youth Services Consultants

Dear Colleagues -

Thank you for your continued support of Summer Reading at New York Libraries, the statewide summer reading program.

We’re writing today to inform you that there will be a presentation about the statewide summer reading program at the Board of Regents meeting in Albany on Monday, June 13. The presentation will take place during the 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. Full Board meeting. The Full Board meeting will be webcast.  A link to the webcast will be available the morning of June 13 at the following website: http://www.regents.nysed.gov/meetings.

We invite you to watch the presentation and join us in launching the 2016 statewide summer reading program.

The State Education Department will also be posting tweets throughout the presentation on their Twitter account: @NYSEDNews. We encourage systems and member libraries to retweet the summer reading posts and help promote the importance of summer reading. Please also share your photos and tweets about the summer reading program in your systems and libraries throughout the summer by tagging the Department’s Twitter handle @NYSEDNews.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions. Please contact Sharon Phillips, Coordinator, Summer Reading at New York Libraries at Sharon.Phillips@nysed.gov.

We look forward to another successful summer reading season!
Thank you,

Bernard A. Margolis

State Librarian and Assistant Commissioner for Libraries

New York State Library

New York State Education Department

Bernard.margolis@nysed.gov

Ask Joe: Disposal of Personal Property and Competitive Bidding

Q. If a library wishes to dispose of personal property such as books, materials or equipment, must competitive bidding procedures ne utilized?

Note: the following should not be construed as legal advice for which the service of counsel should be obtained. Association library boards may  find that the guidelines offered in the opinions cited, although  related to public libraries, school districts and municipal corporations, are also appropriate to circumstances  involving disposition of books, materials and personal property regardless of type of library. All library boards would be well advised to adopt by resolution a procedure which authorizes the disposition of surplus, irreparable or obsolete  library property.

 

A. Not necessarily. Library trustees have the power to sell unneeded library property in such manner “…as they shall deem to be in the best interest of the library”  (34 Op State Compt 35, 1979).

 

Books and materials- ….[P]rior to the disposition of used or surplus books or other such reading materials by trustees of a chartered public or free association library which receives over ten thousand  dollars in state aid, such trustees shall offer to donate such books or materials to a not-for-profit corporation or political subdivision located within the area of the library system or offer to sell such books or materials to the general public [emphasis supplied]. The trustees shall retain any proceeds received from the sale of such books or materials for the purpose of maintaining and improving library service within the system (Education Law s226(6); Education Law s260(12)).

 

When asked, “…who is responsible for establishing whether the used or surplus books or other reading material have a ‘market value and, if they do have a ‘market value’ what amount should be charged to the general public when these item items are offered for sale,….”, the Comptroller stated: “[I]t is our opinion that this function may… be delegated by the library trustees to an officer or employee of the library who is qualified to make the necessary determinations. …[T]he library director would seem to be an appropriately qualified individual [who determination will be subject to the trustees’ approval] The library should receive a reasonable amount for the items solo to the general public. Under the language of the statutes, there is no express authorization to sell to any single individual or entity, such as a not-for-profit corporation, books or other materials which might be discarded. If items are determined to have no ‘market value’, they may be donated to such entity for whatever use the corporation desires. However, if the corporation were then to re-sell the books in their existing condition, it would seem to be an indication that the items had a  ‘market value’. It would seem that any items remaining unsold after several attempts to sell might then be determined to have “no market value” and could then be donated as provided in the statute (OP State Compt 80-314, 1980 (unreported)).

 

Personal property- in 31 Op State Compt 161, 1975, the Comptroller stated: “The [library] trustees have the power to sell library property in such manner as they shall deem to be in the best interest of the library”. However, “…personal property must no longer be needed… before such a sale can take place. When such determination is made, there is no monetary limit on the value of personal property which may be sold at a negotiated or private sale. Of course… [there is] an obligation to obtain the best possible for the personal property…. For this reason, some… will conduct an auction sale, whereas others will check around and obtain various quotations so that they can determine what the best possible price would be, so that they may then sell for such price at private sale…. In such case, no formal bidding procedures are required” (34 Op State Compt 35, 1978).

The Comptroller advised a board of education “…that a school district may sell unneeded personal property without advertising for bids (20 Op  St Compt 322 (1964); 14 Op St Compt 125 (1958). “….On the other hand, the sale of property by means of advertising for sealed bids is generally thought to be a safer and more preferable method (18 OP St Compt 90, 1962). When the board of education belie4ves that this method would serve the interest of the school district by allowing it to receive the best available price… the use of this method of sales  is to be encouraged” (22 Op State Compt 539, 1966).

“Any sale of property of a municipal corporation… must of course be made for fair consideration…. [Any such property may not be conveyed] to private individuals for a nominal consideration or for less than  the best possible price obtainable…..’ The question of what constitutes fair and adequate consideration is within the sound discretion of the board of trustees” (OP State Compt 80-125, 1980 (unreported)). However, the Comptroller advised a town that “When an obsolete item of personal property has no appreciable market value, we do not believe a town would be making a gift within the meaning and intent of Article VIII, s1 [of the State Constitution] or committing an act of waste if it discarded or destroyed the item, or donated the item to a private-not-for-profit corporation (28 Opns State Comp , 1972, p. 38). Indeed, donating these items might actually result in savings of town moneys since the town might otherwise have to pay to cart away these obsolete machines. The fact that the property could not be sold at public sale certainly represents some evidence that it has no market value…”  (Op State Compt 80-232m 1980 (unreported)).

Webinar with Rebekkah Smith Aldrich (June 14): “What’s New in the Trustee Handbook?”

On Tuesday, June 14 from 10 am to 11 am, the New York State Library and the Library Trustees Association of New York State will offer a webinar by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich entitled, “What’s New in the Trustee Handbook?”

What you need to know now! Join co-author Rebekkah Smith Aldrich as she summarizes the highlights of what is new in the 2015 edition of the Handbook for Library Trustees of New York State. From regulatory issues that every board needs to be on top of to planning for the future, the new handbook supports the critical work of library trustees in the 21st century.

Rebekkah Smith Aldrich is the co-author of the Handbook for Library Trustees of New York State and author of the Handbook for New Public Library Directors in New York State.  A frequent national presenter on topics ranging from the management and governance of public libraries to sustainable funding and public library facilities, Rebekkah has assisted public libraries of all types in New York since 1998. She has served the New York Library Association as a Councilor-at-Large, President of the Leadership & Management Section (LAMS) and as a long-time member of the Legislative Committee. Learn more about Rebekkah at https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebekkahaldrich.

The primary audience for this webinar is trustees, but others are welcome to attend. The webinar will count as continuing education for New York State Public Librarian Certification.

The URL to register and join the trustee webinar session is https://meetny.webex.com/meetny/onstage/g.php?MTID=edffc85db9b048d4b74668521484b188d

Event password:  handbook16

Registration is required.

The pc requirements for WebEx are listed here:  https://meetings.webex.com/collabs/support/nfaqs?_iframe=/webex/v1.3/support/en_US/rn/system_rn.htm

To test your pc ahead of time you may run a test session at https://www.webex.com/test-meeting.html

The webinar will be archived on the State Library’s website at a future date. Please see http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/webinars/index.html for information on upcoming webinars and access to archived webinars.

If you have questions regarding this webinar please contact Amy Heebner, Division of Library Development, New York State Library at 518-474-4883 or Amy.Heebner@nysed.gov.